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Retreat Garden Long View
Forest Pansy Redbud
Giant Chain Fern
Italian Cypress
Butterfly-Iris, Fortnight Lily
Petunia
Dwarf Morning Glory
Forest Pansy Redbud

Common name: Forest Pansy Redbud
Botanical name: Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy'

This small tree may reach 25' tall and it has dark green/purple leaves that are purple in the fall. Amazing pink flowers bloom in the spring and fill the tree.

Giant Chain Fern

Common name: Giant Chain Fern
Botanical name: Woodwardia fimbriata

The Giant Chain Fern is a large fern that grows 4'-8' tall. It can tolerate full sun but does best in some shade. This fern is native to California and is drought tolerant.

Italian Cypress

Common name: Italian Cypress
Botanical name: Cupressus sempervirens 'Stricta'

Italian Cypress is often associated with Italian and Spanish architecture, providing columns in the landscape. They often reach 60' tall. 'Stricta' is compact, columnar and produces long, straight branches with deep green foliage.

Butterfly-Iris, Fortnight Lily

Common name: Butterfly-Iris, Fortnight Lily
Botanical name: Dietes iridioides

This clumping evergreen Iris bears tall, narrow leaves to 30" tall and white flowers marked purple in the center on stalks up to 3' tall. This variety has stiffer, darker foliage than the bicolor form. It requires sun to part shade with little or no summer watering when established.

Petunia

Common name: Petunia
Botanical name: Petunia X hybrida

This plant will grow 1'-3' tall and has medium-sized green leaves with multi-colored flowers that bloom in spring and summer.

Dwarf Morning Glory

Common name: Dwarf Morning Glory
Botanical name: Convolvulus sabatius

Convolvulus sabaticus is a perennial that grows 1'-2' high, with branches that spread to 3' or more. It produces blue to lavender flowers with blooms of 1"-2" wide. The soft, evergreen leaves are 1/2" to 1.5" long.

Designer: The Plant Nerd

Retreat Garden Long View

Photographer: GardenSoft

Water Saving Tip:

Replace turf with groundcovers, trees, and shrubs. If you have areas where no one uses the grass, patches that do not grow well, or a turf area too small to water without runoff, consider replacing the turf with water-efficient landscaping.